GE's produced-water evaporation technologies have been selected by Brion Energy for Phase 1 of the MacKay River Commercial Project (MRCP) near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada.

The MacKay River project will utilize a steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) technique to produce bitumen, a type of heavy oil. By using GE's produced water evaporation process, the project will recover 99 percent of the produced and makeup water fed to the plant for reuse as boiler feedwater. The MacKay River project has an ultimate design capacity of 150,000 barrels per day (bpd) that will be achieved across four phases, with Phase 1 contributing the first 35,000 bpd.

GE's produced-water evaporation technologies have been selected by Brion Energy for Phase 1 of the MacKay River Commercial Project (MRCP) near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada.

The MacKay River project will utilize a steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) technique to produce bitumen, a type of heavy oil. By using GE's produced water evaporation process, the project will recover 99 percent of the produced and makeup water fed to the plant for reuse as boiler feed water. The MacKay River project has an ultimate design capacity of 150,000 barrels per day (bpd) that will be achieved across four phases, with Phase 1 contributing the first 35,000 bpd.

According to GE, the steam-assisted gravity drainage technology is helping producers minimize water consumption and comply with the Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board regulations and directives pertaining to water use. Evaporators and drum boilers offer economic advantages over water treatment and once-through steam generation technologies. With the addition of GE's contaminant reduction system, the produced water treatment system will produce a high-quality distillate suitable for use as feed water to conventional drum boilers.